Tag Archives: MTBos

3 Act Lessons at #SummerMathCamp

#SummerMathCamp 2016 was a busy, insightful week full of notice and wonder about math. Thirty-eight educators chose to spend a week of their summer with us exploring some big ideas in the K-5 standards. We explored number routines and math work stations. We read, reflected, and chatted about the power the SMPs bring to our teaching and students’ learning. We shared the wonder of the #MTBoS; Which One Doesn’t Belong, Estimation 180, Fraction Talks, Number Talk Images, along with our most favorite tasks from our classrooms.

One of the highlights of #SummerMathCamp was introducing our colleagues to the MTBoS’s gem: the 3 Act Lesson.

On Day 1, the campers had the opportunity to experience a 3 act task as a learner. They participated in a 3 Act called “Making It Rain” from The Learning Kaleidoscope. In addition to experiencing the 3 Act, the educators were shown Graham Fletcher’s Cookie Monster. We chatted about what happens each of the three acts. On Day 2, we showed them Jamie Duncan’s version of Cookie Monster, and portions of other 3 Act tasks. Before working in their grade level teams, we revisited the structure of a 3 Act Task and discussed the beauty of taking an everyday occurrence and finding the math in it. The next two afternoons, grade levels took pictures, made videos, and developed the storyline for their 3 Act Tasks (and in some cases a sequel.) On the last day of camp, we held a RED carpet premiere. Ok..it seemed like that in our heads. In reality, it was popcorn and soda for everyone as their work was débuted.

We’d like to share with you a sample of the awesomeness that these math educators created to use with their kids.

Third grade – “Lego Run

Fifth Grade – “Coinstar

NCTM Conference 2016

National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) annual conference  can be summed up into an equation.  3 days of math awesomeness = one year of inspiration.   (at least that is my hope).  The experience is empowering, motivational, and humbling.  You meet, you talk, you laugh, you notice and you wonder.  You learn that there is a whole network of people outside of your little bubble of a district.

During my time at the conference, I had my “A Ha” moments that I gleamed from so many fabulous speakers. If you aren’t familiar with anyone of these people…stop and google now!

Graham Fletcher

  •   Foster curiosity in your classroom
  •   If it’s important to a kid, it’s important to us
  •   Embrace your high 5’s in math

Annie Fetter

  •   People can’t understand solutions to problems they don’t have.
  •   Students can’t answer questions they didn’t ask
  •   Many students think that math is something done to you, not something you do
  •   SWBCA – Student will be curious about…

Robert Kaplinsky

Is it better to have power or have influence?

Gail Burrill

  •  Think deeply about simple things
  •  Never say anything a kid can say
  • I know what my students understand when I see them in a place they have never been
  • Let the students do the work
  • Find a voice

Graham Fletcher (during a different session)–Watch him here…

  •             You are a story teller…math is our story
  •             Know your standards –Be a wise consumer
  •                         Standards 1st
  •                         Textbooks 2nd

Brian Bushart – Watch him here….

How can we provide students room to explore, to play, and to find joy in doing math?

The best part of the whole conference was being a part of something larger than myself.  There’s a network called MTBoS – otherwise known as the Math Twitter Blog o’Sphere.  It’s an insightful, welcoming, and sharing community of educators that network with one commonality—we are passionate about teaching math.  And I say we because this week I met so many from this network and I had the cool sensation of being a part of something bigger.  Meeting people that I have chatted with via Twitter (@aprilf4175) was amazing.

And so I heard a bunch of “calls to action” from a bunch of respectable educators.  However,  I have settled on one of my own.  At one point during one of the sessions that math coaches were invited to, I had a moment of clarity.  I realized that as much as I would like to make big changes happen and be a voice in my district, it’s not going to happen.  But “Don’t Cry for Me Argentina.”  As Robert Kaplinsky pointed out, is it power or influence?  I’d rather be influential with the people I work with the most, my teachers.  I can influence them to be empowered, to stretch their practice, to try new things, to play, and to have fun.

And so the work continues. I’m invigorated, motivated, and thrilled with prospect of the future.

 

Until next time…

Kristen