Tag Archives: estimation180

New Routines for 6th grade

In my district, there are several 6th grade teams at three separate elementary schools. They are an anomaly in that they are invited to secondary professional developments & textbook trainings with other middle school teachers, but yet they are their own special group.  It’s not easy to have secondary expectations, all the while being at a site with kindergarteners passing by your window.  With all these new expectations, new standards, and a new curriculum guide, I saw the need for help.  Me –being a middle school teacher turned math coach–jumped right in.

Our latest venture at one site has been to start math talks.  I introduced them to Which One Doesn’t Belong, Estimation 180 and Would You Rather. They were excited by these routines because they are engaging for the students.  It’s not their usual math.  It’s different.  The teachers are now sparking conversations with the pictures and questions.  It’s been incredible for them.  I recently took their principal on a math walk into the three 6th grade classrooms so she could observe their new routines.  The principal was supremely happy.

 

One popular thought that came up during our work last year and this year was a simple question….how do you review previous units?  How do we keep information that we did at the beginning of the year fresh?  For instance, 6th grade began the year introducing rates and ratios.  Part of their “Would you rather” routine reviews rates.  For instance…would you rather buy a Starbucks Venti for $3.59 or a Starbucks Grande for $2.99.  Essentially we are asking which is a better buy. We are starting a math argument.

So how do you bring fractions, decimals, percents, and ratios to life?  How do you make that lively and different from what they see in their textbooks?   Well…let’s first look at this pic….

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Donuts from a gift bag at Target

What do you see? What do you notice?  What math questions could we ask?

What fraction of the donuts have green icing?  What’s the ratio between sprinkled donuts to stripped donuts?  What percentage of donuts have chocolate icing? What fraction of the donuts have purple icing?  Can you turn that into a decimal?  

A simple routine comprised of many pictures of donuts, cupcakes, legos, or any variety of objects.  I’ve seen many math educators use pictures like this to start a visual routine/number talk.  Pictures are an amazing way to wake the students up and look at things differently.  I might bring this routine to my kindergarten teachers as a sorting activity.  

So many donuts…..so many possibilities.

Until next time,

Kristen

Number Talk Images

Can I just say that I can’t get enough of visual math routines?  Or do you call it a number talk image?

Some call it a visual number talk.   It’s a picture that’s shown with a known quantity.  Students may start by making observations and ask questions that are lingering in their heads (AKA Notice/Wonder–thanks Annie Fetter!)  Once their questions are answered, they may try guessing a number that’s too low.  Next they’ll try to guess a number that’s too high.  The last number they’ll write down is an actual estimation.

Why should we do this?

  • Develops students’ understanding of quantity
  • Give numbers meaning
  • Help students see the relationships of numbers to one another
  • Support an understanding of how numbers operate

The conceptualization of quantity is foundational to number sense. As students’ abilities to visualize amounts improve, their number sense improves. Their strategies and mental math become efficient and quick.

Once I was introduced to this routine, I was ADDICTED!  It became a mission of mine to find my own pictures.  My goal was to develop a collection of everyday items (thanks Target!) that any other ordinary human would pass up.  Well, this April Fool has you covered.  Every now and then, I stumble across something and take pics like a crazy person.  And yes, I will sit there and count.

So here is something I came across during the after-Christmas sales. How many storage boxes are there?IMG_5834

Just in time for Valentine’s.  How many hearts are on the front side of this bag?

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If you are interested in more of these, I suggestion Andrew Stadel’s Estimation 180.  And if you are interested in more images ,Pierre Tranche’s Number Talk Images is really cool.

 

Oh…and not to leave you hanging.  There are 60 storage boxes and 388 hearts.

Kristen